JADE EDEN | How To Choose The Best CBD Oil



Here’s a step-by-step guide to the factors to consider when shopping for a CBD product.

1. Weigh the pros and cons of why you want to take CBD and what form is best.

The first thing to consider is why you want to take CBD. Though it’s being touted for numerous possible health benefits and some preliminary research suggests it might help with everything from pain and anxiety to multiple sclerosis and opioid addiction and even less is known about which forms of CBD pill, topical, or drop, for example might be appropriate. Still, experts do have some advice.

For very quick relief of, say, muscle cramps or anxiety, inhaling CBD may be most effective, via either a vape pen (think e-cigarette) or cigarette-style. For effects within a few minutes, oil drops under the tongue may be useful. Topical lotions, rubbed onto the skin, vary from person to person some may feel it right away, others not for several hours. On the other hand, CBD in food products is likely to take longer 30 minutes or more—to be absorbed into your system.

2. Where was it grown?

Many CBD products sold online and in retail stores come from hemp, not marijuana. And the source of that hemp can be important.

Most hemp used in CBD products sold in the U.S. comes from Colorado or Oregon (which have long histories with cannabis) or Kentucky (which passed a law to support hemp growers in 2013), or is imported from overseas.

Among those sources Colorado have the most robust hemp program. The state’s agricultural program performs spot-tests of hemp plants while they are still in the field to check THC levels and will investigate the potential use of any illegal pesticides based on complaints.

Products made with hemp grown overseas can be even more problematic, because they are not subject to any state or federal testing. Testing is important and manufacturers should follow the FDA’s guidance for good manufacturing practices.

Customer should check the labels for CBD products from hemp to see whether they say where it was grown, and look especially for those from Colorado. If the information is not available on the label such as in a dispensary or a retail store, ask the staff whether they know where the hemp was grown. And for products purchased online, check the companies’ website to see whether it has that information, or contact the seller to ask the same question.

CBD oil hemp product

3. Avoid products that make dramatic health claims.

Making health claims, even just the ability to treat relatively minor problems like migraines, is legal only for prescription drugs, which undergo extensive testing for effectiveness and safety. And the more dramatic the claim, such as the ability to cure cancer or heart disease, the more skeptical you should be. Since 2015, the FDA has cracked down on dozens of companies selling CBD products online for making unproven health claims.

4. Avoid vaping products with propylene glycol.

Vape pens produce little smoke and are easy to transport and use—plus they can easily go undetected. But the concentrated oils used in vape pens of CBD might contain a solvent called propylene glycol. When burned at high temperatures, propylene glycol can degrade into formaldehyde, a chemical that can irritate the nose and eyes and could increase the risk of asthma and cancer. To avoid this problem, consider CBD vape pens that advertise “solvent-free oils.”

5. Start with products with relatively low doses

Look for products that show how much CBD (or cannabidiol, its full name) you get not just in the whole bottle but in each dose. Dosages, which are expressed in milligrams, or mgs, vary considerably depending on the form of the product, and experts often suggest starting with products that have relatively low doses. For example, with tinctures, consider a product that has just 10 mg per dose.

On the other hand, take extra care with products that list only the amount of total “cannabinoids” they contain, not specifically how much CBD is in them. Those cannabinoids could include not just CBD and THC but dozens of other related compounds. Companies may take that labeling approach because they hope it will attract less scrutiny from the Food and Drug Administration.

Some of those products, which don’t include the CBD amount on their label, market themselves as “whole plant” or “full spectrum” hemp products, or say they are rich in other compounds from the plant, such as various fatty acids. Though it’s possible that those other compounds provide additional health benefits, that’s still uncertain. In those cases, you could check the COA, if they have one, which should list how much CBD or THC they contain.

Our recommend store for CBD products is Tree of Life Botanicals

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